PDF Dual Disorders: Counseling Clients With Chemical Dependency and Mental Illness

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Editorial Reviews. Review. "This updated edition of Dual Disorders by Drs. Daley and Moss Dual Disorders: Counseling Clients with Chemical Dependency and Mental Illness - Kindle edition by Dennis C Daley, Dual Disorders: Counseling Clients with Chemical Dependency and Mental Illness by [Daley, Dennis.
Table of contents

Dennis C. Daley, Ph. Howard P. Moss, M. This course is recommended for health care professionals, especially addiction counselors, psychologists, mental health counselors, and social workers who seek knowledge about counseling clients with dual disorders. Discuss an overview of dual disorders, chemical dependency treatment, recovery from dual disorders, and the importance of family involvement in treatment and recovery. Explain the correlation between personality, antisocial, borderline personality, depression, bipolar, anxiety, schizophrenic, cognitive disorders, and chemical dependency.

Identify the connection with relapse disorders, group treatment and dual disorders, as well as acknowledging the issues in dual disorders program development. For your convenience, this is a link to purchase the material from Amazon. All exam questions for the course are visible on this page for members of Addiction Counselor CE. Membership is free, and you can sign up today! The pressures of deployment or combat can exacerbate underlying mental disorders, and substance abuse is a common way of coping with unpleasant feelings or memories.

Often, these problems take a while to show up after a vet returns home, and may be initially mistaken for readjustment.

In addition to getting professional treatment, there are plenty of self-help steps you can take to address your substance abuse and mental health issues. Remember: Getting sober is only the beginning. Learn how to manage stress. Drug and alcohol abuse often stems from misguided attempts to manage stress.

Stress management skills go a long way towards preventing relapse and keeping your symptoms at bay.

Dual Diagnosis: Mental Health and Addiction - Addiction Center

Cope with unpleasant feelings. Many people turn to alcohol or drugs to cover up painful memories and emotions such as loneliness, depression, or anxiety. Know your triggers and have an action plan.

Mental Health & Substance Abuse

Common causes include stressful events, big life changes, or unhealthy sleeping or eating patterns. At these times, having a plan in place is essential to preventing a drink or drug relapse. Who will you talk to? What do you need to do to avoid slipping? Make face-to-face connection with friends and family a priority. Positive emotional connection to those around you is the quickest way to calm your nervous system.

Try to meet up regularly with people who care about you. Once you are sober and you feel better, you might think you no longer need medication or treatment. But arbitrarily stopping medication or treatment is a common reason for relapse in people with co-occurring disorders. Always talk with your doctor before making any changes to your medication or treatment routine. Get therapy or stay involved in a support group. Your chances of staying sober improve if you are participating in a social support group like Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous or if you are getting therapy.

Exercise regularly. Exercise is a natural way to bust stress, relieve anxiety, and improve your mood and outlook.

To achieve the maximum benefit, aim for at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise on most days. Practice relaxation techniques. When practiced regularly, relaxation techniques such as mindfulness meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, and deep breathing can reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression, and increase feelings of relaxation and emotional well-being.

Adopt healthy eating habits. Start the day right with breakfast, and continue with frequent small meals throughout the day. Going too long without eating leads to low blood sugar, which can make you feel more stressed or anxious. Getting enough healthy fats in your diet can help to boost your mood.

Get enough sleep. A lack of sleep can exacerbate stress, anxiety, and depression, so try to get 7 to 9 hours of quality sleep a night. Develop new activities and interests. Find new hobbies, volunteer activities , or work that gives you a sense of meaning and purpose. Avoid the things that trigger your urge to use. If certain people, places, or activities trigger a craving for drugs or alcohol, try to avoid them. This may mean making major changes to your social life, such as finding new things to do with your old buddies—or even giving up those friends and making new connections.

As with other addictions, groups are very helpful, not only in maintaining sobriety, but also as a safe place to get support and discuss challenges. Sometimes treatment programs for co-occurring disorders provide groups that continue to meet on an aftercare basis. Your doctor or treatment provider may also be able to refer you to a group for people with co-occurring disorders.

A Custom Mental Health Treatment Program

These free programs, facilitated by peers, use group support and a set of guided principles—the twelve steps —to obtain and maintain sobriety. Just make sure your group is accepting of the idea of co-occurring disorders and psychiatric medication.


  1. The Formation of the First German Nation-State, 1800–1871.
  2. Dual Disorders: Counseling Clients With Chemical Dependency and Mental Illness.
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  5. SAGE Books - Issues and Problems with Dual Diagnosis.

Some people in these groups, although well meaning, may mistake taking psychiatric medication as another form of addiction. Included in this book is an overview of dual disorders, pharmacotherapeutic treatments, and client resources. Dennis C. Daley, Ph. Howard P.

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Comorbidity: Substance Use Disorders and Other Mental Illnesses

Moss, M. This course is recommended for health care professionals, especially addiction counselors, psychologists, mental health counselors, and social workers who seek knowledge about counseling clients with dual disorders. Discuss an overview of dual disorders, chemical dependency treatment, recovery from dual disorders, and the importance of family involvement in treatment and recovery.

Explain the correlation between personality, antisocial, borderline personality, depression, bipolar, anxiety, schizophrenic, cognitive disorders, and chemical dependency. Identify the connection with relapse disorders, group treatment and dual disorders, as well as acknowledging the issues in dual disorders program development.

For your convenience, this is a link to purchase the material from Amazon. All exam questions for the course are visible on this page for members of Addiction Counselor CE.